HOPE

Non-Malignant Brain Tumours in the News

The Impact of a Brain Tumour, Regardless of Stage or Grade

Sheryl Crow diagnosed with Meningioma benign brain tumour

This week we all learned about singer-songwriter Sheryl Crow’s diagnosis of a non-malignant (reportedly Meningioma) brain tumour.

And so, once again, we are reminded that brain tumours don’t discriminate; they affect people of all ages and backgrounds.

Sheryl Crow’s announcement has shone the light on brain tumours and allowed us to raise further public awareness about the disease, including the seriousness of all brain tumours, regardless of their stage or grade.

On June 6, 2012, Susan Marshall, Executive Director of Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada appeared on CTV National News to discuss the impact of a brain tumour, and you can watch her appearance.

Susan Marshall on CTV about Sheryl Crow's benign brain tumour diagnosis
 

As so many survivors and family members know, because the tumour is found in the brain, it can affect all facets of your life – it’s why we refer to the lower grade tumours as ‘non-malignant’ rather than ‘benign’. When something is causing an impact on your brain, it’s hard to see it as neutral or harmless.

A brain tumour can affect vision, hearing, memory, balance and mobility. Its effects can be physical, emotional, financial, and for many people, last a lifetime. Lifting this burden for anyone affected is our goal. This is why we offer specialized programs and services like the Non-Malignant Patient Resource Handbook and support groups for anyone affected.

A recent study found people who receive frequent dental x-rays may be at an increased risk for meningioma brain tumours. Find all the most recent research news in this section of our site.

We’re here to help you and anyone affected by a brain tumour, and the support of donors means that the estimated 55,000 Canadians living with a brain tumour can find hope.

Hope through research. Hope through support. Hope for a cure.

 

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Today, 8 Canadians will learn they have brain cancer. That's 3,000 Canadians each year. That's why we have launched Hats for Hope a nation-wide brain cancer awareness campaign and are calling on all Canadians to pledge support for brain cancer research. Join us in International Brain Tumour Awareness Week, October 20 - 27, 2018, or on October 24, 2018 – the first Brain Cancer Awareness Day in Canada – by wearing a hat, taking a selfie or group photo, and sharing it on social using #HatsForHope

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Upcoming Events

  • 24/Oct/2018: Ottawa Support Group: Meets at the Maplesoft Centre at 1500 Alta Vista Drive, Ottawa, ON.... Learn more >
  • 25/Oct/2018: Virtual Support Group East: Virtual Support Group for Eastern Canada... Learn more >
  • 27/Oct/2018: National Conference - Montreal: Hôtel Ruby Foo's, Montreal, QC & diffusion en direct... Learn more >
  • 27/Oct/2018: SUPERKIDS - A Quest to End Brain Tumours: CitiPlaza, London, ON... Learn more >
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