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Wayne Fleming dies of brain cancer

Former Edmonton Oilers assistant coach Wayne Fleming dies of brain cancer

March 28, 2013

Wayne Fleming dies of brain cancerYesterday, we learned that "hockey's everyman", former Edmonton Oilers assistant coach, died of brain cancer on Monday. He passed away two years after his diagnosis - when he was working for the Tampa Bay Lightning. Wayne Fleming is survived by his wife Carolyn and four children.

Wayne was a prolific contributor to the sport of hockey in Canada. His many roles included serving as assistant coach in the National Hockey League (NHL) for the Edmonton Oilers, Calgary Flames, Philadelphia Flyers, Phoenix Coyotes, New York Islanders and Tampa Bay Lightning. He also served as both assistant and head coach for Team Canada in international tournaments.

Any time a life is lost due to a brain tumour, we are saddened and it motivates us to continue working, every day, towards finding the cause of and cure for this disease while also improving the quality of life for those affected.

Every day 27 Canadians are diagnosed with a brain tumour, that’s more than one person every hour. We are here to help everyone as we work together towards a cure. When these types of announcements occur, it brings to the forefront for everyone, that brain tumours can affect anyone and have a profound impact on patients and families.

We will continue to raise funds to work to improve the quality-of-life of patients and to fund the research necessary to find the ever-elusive cure.  You can join us as we continue the fight. Find all the ways you can help here.

Finally, we also send our thoughts to everyone affected by a brain tumour, whether you are newly diagnosed, under treatment, in recovery or coping with the loss of a loved one. If you or someone you know has been affected by a brain tumour, you can lean on us.

 Find more 'people of note' affected by brain tumours.

 

Photo shared courtesy of Hockey Canada

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