Neurofibromatosis Type 1

Overview


Tumour Group: Other Brain Tumours and Related Conditions
WHO Grade: n/a
Prevalence/Incidence:  
Typical Age Range:  

Contents
Description of Tumour
Symptoms
Treatment / Standard of Care
Prognosis
References

Description of Tumour


Neurofibromatosis Type 1 is an autosomal dominant disorder that is passed from one generation to the next, but occurs spontaneously in about 50 per cent of cases. Classical signs of  Neurofibromatosis Type 1 include skin changes with cafe-au-lait spots, freckling and cutaneous neurofibromas. Learning disabilities and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder may also occur. Many types of brain tumours are associated with neurofibromatosis, but the most common are optic pathway tumours, cerebral astrocytomas, and focal areas of signal intensity (FASI).

This disorder is sometimes referred to as Von Recklinghausen's Disease.

Symptoms


Information to come.

Treatment / Standard of Care


Information to come.

Prognosis  


A prognosis is an estimate of the likely progress of a disease after a diagnosis, based on an average patient group. Since every person is different, please take time to talk with your health care team about how this information applies to you.

By clicking on 'Expand,' a statistic on the prognosis for Neurofibromatosis Type 1 will be shown.

Expand for Prognosis Information

For brain tumour patients, a prognosis depends on several factors, which can include age and other health issues, the size of the tumour, its molecular profile, the type of tumour, how much can be removed, and its response to treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

Information to come.

References


Image credited to Hellerhoff (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

 

From the day twins, James and Emily, were born, they were never apart. But when they were six, this changed in a way their parents could never have imagined. James was diagnosed with neurofibromatosis, a condition which impacted his vision so much he is now legally blind. To date, James has had 75 MRIs and there are more in his future. He attends a school for the blind and is busy with sports, DJing and a special music recording class – all while learning to live with this life-long challenge.

Read James' incredible story of hope >>

 

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