Hemangioblastoma

Overview


Tumour Group:  
WHO Grade: Grade I
Prevalence/Incidence:  
Typical Age Range:  

Contents
Description of Tumour
Symptoms
Treatment / Standard of Care
Prognosis
References

Description of Tumour


Hemangioblastomas are typically made up of stromal cells, which are connective tissue cells that support certain organ functions. This type of tumour usually occurs in the cerebellum, brainstem or spinal cord, and may run in families.

Hemangioblastomas may be part of a genetic condition called Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome or they may occur separately from VHL syndrome.

Symptoms


Hemangioblastoma symptoms depend on tumour location. 

Treatment / Standard of Care


Treatment for hemangioblastomas includes surgery and possibly radiation.

Prognosis  


A prognosis is an estimate of the likely progress of a disease after a diagnosis, based on an average patient group. Since every person is different, please take time to talk with your health care team about how this information applies to you.

By clicking on 'Expand,' a statistic on the prognosis for hemangioblastomas will be shown.

Expand for Prognosis Information

For brain tumour patients, a prognosis depends on several factors, which can include age and other health issues, the size of the tumour, its molecular profile, the type of tumour, how much can be removed, and its response to treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

Limited information available for this type of tumour and/or related conditions.

References


Image credited to Public Library of Science journal. Their website states that the content of all PLoS journals is published under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 license. (File:Hippel Lindau.gif) [CC-BY-SA-2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5) or CC-BY-2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons

 

A lot can happen over the course of 30 years: marriage, new homes, job changes and children. For Murray Cass, the past three decades have brought all of these things, plus more: the journey with a brain tumour. Murray is a three-time hemangioblastoma survivor, with 1982 marking his first diagnosis.

Read Murray's inspiring story about his brain tumour journey >>

 

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