Dysembryoplastic Neuroepithelial Tumour (DNET)

Overview


Tumour Group: Gliomas
WHO Grade: Grade I
Prevalence/Incidence:  
Typical Age Range:  

Contents
Description of Tumour
Symptoms
Treatment / Standard of Care
Prognosis
References

Description of Tumour


Usually located in the temporal lobe, dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour (DNET) is often associated with a seizure disorder. 

Symptoms


Information to come.

Treatment / Standard of Care


Information to come.

Prognosis  


A prognosis is an estimate of the likely progress of a disease after a diagnosis, based on an average patient group. Since every person is different, please take time to talk with your health care team about how this information applies to you.

By clicking on 'Expand,' a statistic on the prognosis for dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour (DNET) will be shown.

Expand for Prognosis Information

For brain tumour patients, a prognosis depends on several factors, which can include age and other health issues, the size of the tumour, its molecular profile, the type of tumour, how much can be removed, and its response to treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

DNETs are considered Grade I and tend to have the most favourable survival rates compared to other higher grade brain tumours. 

References


Image credited to http://radiopaedia.org/cases/dysembryoplastic-neuroepithelial-tumour-dnet-4

Emily, Youth Education Award recipient"Since the diagnosis my life has been quite the roller coaster ride. I have traveled to multiple cities, saw many doctors, and learned way more about the medical field and myself as a person, than I could have ever imagined. One of the hardest parts of my journey thus far was recovering from surgery in 2013. I was fortunate enough to be surrounded by my family and friends the entire time, which enabled me to keep a positive and optimistic mind set. In the end, things always have a way of working themselves out, everything happens for a reason." Read more about Emily, a Youth Education Award recipient... 

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