Childhood Cancer Awareness Month

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Sheila Singh – 2020 Feature Grant Recipient

Glioblastoma grant generously funded by ‘Vikes Kicks Cancer’ event in honour of MacKenzie Rigg

Sheila SinghSheila Singh – McMaster University

Project Title: “Targeting Glioblastoma Recurrence with anti-ROBO1 Immunotherapy”

Description of Project:

Therapy failure and disease recurrence are hallmarks of glioblastoma, the most common and lethal tumour in adults that originates in the brain.

Recently, we applied a large-scale functional genetic approach, known as CRISPR screening, to discover key genes that enable the tumour to resist therapy and grow at recurrence. We found that recurrent tumour cells rely heavily on cellular activity initiated by a protein known as Roundabout guidance receptor 1 (ROBO1), such that genetic disruption of this protein’s activity or targeting ROBO1 using synthetic antibodies is lethal to tumour cells.

In fact, ROBO1 is present at greater levels on the surface of tumour cells at recurrence as compared to normal brain cells, making it a suitable candidate for therapeutic intervention. Given our strong track record in developing immunotherapies for glioblastoma, we propose to arm immune cells called T cells with a synthetic protein that binds to ROBO1, allowing these chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells to recognize ROBO1 on tumour cells and destroy them.

By developing a therapy that specifically targets tumour cells at recurrence, we hope to alleviate disease burden and extend survival of glioblastoma patients.

 

What receiving this award means:

Accounting for nearly half of all primary malignant brain tumours in adults, glioblastoma (GBM) remains an incurable disease with a median survival of ~15 months. My lab and I are extremely grateful to Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada for supporting this promising work on the development of immunotherapy for GBM.  By developing a therapy that specifically targets tumour cells at recurrence, we hope to alleviate disease burden and extend survival of GBM patients. Thank you Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada!